Letter: It’s as good a time as ever to garden and keep bees healthy

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Dean Fosdick via AP

As we remain in social isolation to protect public health, there are some steps that can be taken to protect the health of the environment as well.

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As the first day of spring approaches, many will want to enjoy the sunshine and warmth of the new season. But as we remain in social isolation to protect public health, there are some steps that can be taken to protect the health of the environment as well.

One of the biggest challenges during this time of year is the death of millions of bees. These bees pollinate 90% of our food crops. If they die, we will simply have less healthy fruits, vegetables and nuts and more corn and soy. Scientists believe this is due to the use of a pesticide called neonicotinoids, which gets into the pollen of the plant once it is treated. This chemical is 6,000 times more toxic to bees than other pesticides.

So what can you do to help? With many Americans working remotely from home right now, it is a great time to try a new hobby of gardening. Planting bee-loving plants and flowers, such as cosmos and echinacea, promotes a healthy bee-friendly environment and gives them a safe space to thrive. Instead of using pesticides like Round-Up, try opting for hand-picking weeds or using natural options like vinegar and dish soap.

Together we can help preserve the natural pollinators and protect the environment.

Cassidy White

UMass Dartmouth MASSPIRG Intern

East Taunton